Tag Archives: BLM

Two year old Pregnant Mare Dies at Palomino Valley Center

12 Jul

Yesterday, after seeing a photo posted by Patty Summerson-Bumgarner on facebook of a dead mare at Palomino Valley Center, I was urged to contact the correctional facility where the foal was taken.  I called them and was told they had no idea what I was talking about.  So I called Palomino Valley Center  775-475-2222  Saturday morning at 11:48 AM to ask about the new foal that was born as mentioned in the news report posted by  KTVN:

BLM Foal Taken to Orphan Care

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“Photos surfaced online Saturday of a mare that passed away during childbirth overnight Thursday at the Palomino Valley Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse and burro holding facility. 
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John Neill of the Bureau of Land Management confirmed that the 2 year old mare was found deceased when workers arrived early Friday morning. The mother and foal were removed from the pen and the foal was successfully delivered. The foal was taken to Northern Nevada Correctional Center where the BLM has an orphan care program. “

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What’s Wrong with the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program? LOTS!

20 Apr

While reading Necktag #5846 profile information on the bidding page I realized she was a a young foal when captured and now has spent 5.5 years in short term holding. As I reviewed the Elm Creek, Nebraska photo gallery, I noticed some of the horses available for internet adoption auction had been in short term holding facilities all their lives, 6 years for some while others were “born in a holding facility” and some of these did not indicate which holding facility or the HMA of origin.
It is annoying that they can’t keep good records about the cattle grazing on public lands, or have solid data on the numbers of horses and burros still running free so it’s not new that the Wild Horse and Burro Program cannot track foals in holding pens and know their HMA of origin. Or, maybe they do know but can’t recall or find the missing data? It doesn’t help that any foals born in a holding facility aren’t counted if they are under 6 months old. And if they die, they still don’t count! Yet vetting, food and care during the first six months of their lives is still paid for via tax dollars. What a way to run a federal program! They don’t count everything we pay for….

 

Gray 6  old mare from Lost Creek (Cyclone Rim) Herd Management Area

Gray 6 old mare from Lost Creek (Cyclone Rim) Herd Management Area

For the past few weeks, I’ve been checking the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Internet Adoption pages to see what horses are there and prepare to make some tweets in advance for more exposure to find homes for the wild horses and burros. However, this isn’t easy or quick to do because there are no social media share buttons on their pages!

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Spin, lies and BLM’s advisor Boyd Spratling DVM

3 Nov

Spin, lies and BLM’s advisor Boyd Spratling D.V.M. | Protect Mustangs™.

Boyd Sprattling, DVM, BLM Wild horse and Burro advisory board member

Boyd Sprattling, DVM, BLM Wild horse and Burro advisory board member

Besides some of the comments made by ranchers, and Boyd Spratling DVM, BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory board member, I could not believe my eyes when I got to the end of the video and saw that Protect the Harvest and UNITED HORSEMEN made and produced this video! Continue reading

Remembering Triple B

19 Oct

Fillies (TRIPLE B HMA) at Palomino Valley Center August 2011 photo ©2011 afroditi katsikis

Fillies (TRIPLE B HMA) at Palomino Valley Center August 2011
photo ©2011 afroditi katsikis

More roundups in Nevada are  scheduled to start soon and one of them is Triple B HMA.  It’s been more than 3 years since the Triple B roundup in the summer of 2011 – my first roundup! Going to this roundup (BLM speak: ‘gather’) was an eye opener for me and deepened my commitment to speak out about the roundups. [My first posts on this blog were about going to the Triple B roundup!] Continue reading

BLM Responds To Wyoming Roundup Accusations via Utah Public Radio

3 Oct

How co-incidental the roundup began September 15, 2014?  That’s just a couple of weeks before the end of the fiscal year. If they do NOT spend the money allotted in the current budget, they will have a harder time asking for increases in the future, won’t they?  Using up their budget is more important to them, not the wild horses or burros especially not those in holding pens.  BLM’s humane standards for the horses in their care still hasn’t been published to the public yet … one more roundup, horses dead needlessly, and still BLM has no understanding of the horse much less about the wild horses.
 

Wild horse preservationists have called into question the legality of the wild horse roundup in the checkerboard area of Wyoming which began Sept. 15.

Shelly Gregory with the Wyoming High Desert District of the Bureau of Land Management asserts the Wild Horse and Burro Act allows private land owners to request the BLM remove wild horses from their property.

“The BLM is respecting the rights of private land owners to operate their land as they see fit,” Gregory said.

BLM Responds To Wyoming Roundup Accusations | UPR Utah Public Radio.

 

BLM Wild Horse and Burro Myths and Facts are Twisted

19 Sep

Horses crossing a plain near the Simpson Park ...

Horses crossing a plain near the Simpson Park Wilderness Study Area (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the lawsuit by the Rock Springs Grazing Assn against the BLM WH&B program – BLM caved in and agreed with the plaintiff more or less. However, it was the BLM WH&B staff that recommended the Rock Springs grazing association file a lawsuit against the BLM. That lawsuit has got to be the shortest lawsuit in which the BLM was named plaintiff. The lawsuits they aggressively litigate,  go on for years and are the ones that wild horse advocates have filed.

The BLM WH&B program has never followed the science, has never asked for or accepted help by those people who really care and know about wild horses and they have loaded their advisory board with ranchers and pro-slaughter folks and not with people who do NOT have affiliation with cattle ranchers or horse slaughter.

This board is totally jaded against wild horses roaming free. BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board is an expensive farce and adds insult to injury by their recommendations – the latest one is to export 100 burros to Guatamala where they will become beasts of burden. The BLM has also misconstrued the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro act to suit the ranchers, frackers, miners, timber harvesters and solar farm industries but rarely honestly protect the animals they were charged to protect.

Last night while trying to locate the gather report for the Great Divide Basin I stumbled across this page on the BLM website:  Myths and Facts

Many of the ‘Myths’ and facts are BLM interpretations based on the NAS report that was given to the BLM in the summer of 2013.  They  misconstrued the NAS report that came out last year to fit the needs of their other ‘clients’ who don’t have the same federal protection as the wild horses and burros. Makes me wonder who is filling their pockets?

The BLM stated Myths that are facts and facts which are myths for the most part. Some of their references used below are not reliable sources of information.

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Myths and Facts

Contact: Tom Gorey, BLM Public Affairs (202-912-7420)

Updated as of August 15, 2014

Myth #1: A report issued in June 2013 by a 14-member research committee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommended that the BLM stop gathering wild horses and burros from Western public rangelands and let nature cull any excess herds.

Fact: These characterizations are completely erroneous. NAS’s Board on Agricultural and Natural Resources (BANR), which oversees the academy’s natural resource studies, issued a special-edition newsletter in July that said: “Some news accounts have incorrectly reported that the study found that the Bureau should stop gathers and ‘let nature cull any excess herds.’ In fact, the report recommends more intensive management of the horses and burros….” BANR then cited several management measures recommended by the report, including using scientifically rigorous methods to estimate the number of animals on the range; modeling the effects of management actions, such as the use of fertility-control treatments on mares and stallions and the removal of animals through gathers, on wild horse and burro health; and, following gathers, using the available one-year fertility-control vaccine (known as PZP) more widely and consistently to treat some mares.

The 383-page report itself, titled “Using Science to Improve the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program: A Way Forward,” makes it clear that to “let nature cull any excess herds” is not a viable option. The preface to the report, which does challenge the status quo of wild horse management, goes on to say in the very next sentence: “It is equally evident that the consequences of simply letting horse populations, which increase at a mean annual rate approaching 20 percent, expand to the level of ‘self-limitation’—bringing suffering and death due to disease, dehydration, and starvation accompanied by degradation of the land—are also unacceptable.”

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Myth #2: The BLM is selling or sending wild horses to slaughter.

Fact: This charge is absolutely false. The Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management care deeply about the well-being of wild horses, both on and off the range, and it has been and remains the policy of the BLM not to sell or send wild horses or burros to slaughter. Consequently, as the Government Accountability Office noted in a report issued in October 2008, the BLM is not in compliance with a December 2004 amendment (the so-called Burns Amendment to the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act) that directs the Bureau to sell excess horses or burros “without limitation” to any willing buyer.

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Myth #3: Horses are held in crowded “holding pens.”

Fact: This assertion is false. The BLM’s short-term holding corrals provide ample space to horses, along with clean feed and water, while long-term holding pastures – large ranches located mainly in Kansas and Oklahoma – permit the horses to roam freely on approximately 289,000 acres of grassland.

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Myth #4: Since 1971, the BLM has illegally or improperly taken away more than 20 million acres set aside for wild horses and burros (from 53.8 million acres to 31.6 million acres).

Fact: This claim is false. No specific amount of acreage was “set aside” for the exclusive use of wild horses and burros under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The Act directed the BLM to determine the areas where horses and burros were found roaming and to manage them “in a manner that is designed to achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance on the public lands.” The law also stipulated in Section 1339 that “Nothing in this Act shall be construed to authorize the [Interior] Secretary to relocate wild free-roaming horses or burros to areas of the public lands where they do not presently exist.” Of the 22.2 million acres no longer managed for wild horse and burro use:

6.7 million acres were never under BLM management.
Of the 15.5 million other acres of land under BLM management:
48.6 percent (7,522,100 acres) were intermingled (“checkerboard”) land ownerships or areas where water was not owned or controlled by the BLM, which made management infeasible;
13.5 percent (2,091,709 acres) were lands transferred out of the BLM’s ownership to other agencies, both Federal and state through legislation or exchange;
10.6 percent (1,645,758 acres) were lands where there were substantial conflicts with other resource values (such as the need to protect habitat for desert tortoise);
9.7 percent (1,512,179 acres) were lands removed from wild horse and burro use through court decisions; urban expansion; highway fencing (causing habitat fragmentation); and land withdrawals;
9.6 percent (1,485,068 acres) were lands where no BLM animals were present at the time of the passage of the 1971 Act or places where all animals were claimed as private property. These lands in future land-use plans will be subtracted from the BLM totals as they should never have been designated as lands where herds were found roaming; and
8.0 percent (1,240,894 acres) were lands where a critical habitat component (such as winter range) was missing, making the land unsuitable for wild horse and burro use, or areas that had too few animals to allow for effective management.
(The percentages above were current as of July 25, 2011.)

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Myth #5: The BLM is managing wild horse herds to extinction.

Fact: This charge is patently false. The current on-the-range population of wild horses and burros (approximately 49,200) is greater than the number found roaming in 1971 (about 25,300). The BLM is seeking to achieve the appropriate management level of 26,684 wild horses and burros on Western public rangelands, or about 22,500 fewer than the current West-wide population. The BLM also actively monitors the genetics of each herd by sending genetic samples to Dr. Gus Cothran at Texas A&M University. Dr. Cothran furnishes the BLM a report on every sample with recommendations for specific herds.

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Myth #6: The BLM removes wild horses to make room for more cattle grazing on public rangelands.

Fact: This claim is totally false. The removal of wild horses and burros from public rangelands is carried out to ensure rangeland health, in accordance with land-use plans that are developed in an open, public process. These land-use plans are the means by which the BLM carries out its core mission, which is to manage the land for multiple uses while protecting the land’s resources. Livestock grazing on BLM-managed land has declined by 35 percent since 1971 (when Congress passed the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act) — from 12.1 million Animal Unit Months (AUMs or forage units) to 7.9 million AUMs in 2013.

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Myth #7: The BLM lacks the legal authority to gather animals from overpopulated herds or to use helicopters in doing so.

Fact: This assertion is false. Section 1333 of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act mandates that once the Interior Secretary “determines…on the basis of all information currently available to him, that an overpopulation exists on a given area of the public lands and that action is necessary to remove excess animals, he shall immediately remove excess animals from the range so as to achieve appropriate management levels.” Section 1338 of the law authorizes the BLM’s use of helicopters and motorized vehicles in its management of wild horses and burros.

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Myth #8: Gathers of wild horses by helicopter are inhumane.

Fact: This claim is false. The BLM’s helicopter-assisted gathers are conducted humanely, as affirmed by three recent independent reports (see below), and have proven to be more humane, effective, and efficient than other types of gather methods when large numbers of animals need to be removed over wide areas or rugged terrain. Helicopters start the horses moving in the right direction and then back off sometimes one-quarter to one-half mile from the animals to let them travel at their own pace; horses are moved at a more rapid pace when they need to be turned or as they reach the entrance to the capture site. Helicopter pilots are better able to keep mares and foals together than horseback riders; pilots can also more effectively move the animals around such barriers as deep ravines, fences, or roads.

In Fiscal Year 2012, out of 10,350 wild horses and burros gathered, a total of 80 animals, or approximately three-quarters of one percent (0.77 percent), died or were euthanized during gather operations; of those 80, 22 animals, or about one-fifth of one percent (0.21 percent) of the gathered animals, died or were euthanized because of acute injuries. Acute injury deaths include all animals that died or were euthanized because of acute injuries, such as spinal cord or head injuries, fractured limbs, or other severe injuries that occurred during gathers. Total deaths include all animals that died or were euthanized for any reason during gathers, including acute or sudden injuries or illnesses, as well as chronic or pre-existing conditions that required euthanasia (such as limb deformities, lameness, and poor body condition).

Two reports issued in the fall of 2010 (one by four independent, credentialed equine professionals and one by the Interior Department’s Office of Inspector General), plus another report released in 2011 by the American Association of Equine (Veterinary) Practitioners, found — without any ideological or political bias — that the BLM’s gathers of wild horses are conducted in a humane manner. The Inspector General determined that the BLM’s gathers are “justified” and reported that the agency “is doing its best to perform a very difficult job.”

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Myth #9: If left alone, wild horses will automatically balance their reproduction rate with rangeland conditions.

Fact: There were an estimated 25,300 wild horses and burros in 1971, and those numbers rose to a peak of more than 60,000 before the BLM was authorized and able to effectively use helicopters for gathers. If left unchecked, Mother Nature would regulate the wild horse and burro population through the classic boom-and-bust cycle, where the population increases dramatically, food becomes scarce, and the population crashes through starvation or dehydration.

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Myth #10: The BLM overestimates the number of wild horses and burros on the range.

Fact: This assertion is false. Currently, most BLM field offices in the West use a “direct count” method that involves the counting of each wild horse and burro actually seen during aerial surveys. This method, the Government Accountability Office (in October 2008) and a National Academy of Sciences research committtee (in June 2013) concluded, results in an undercounting of herd populations. A BLM directive, known as an Instruction Memorandum, seeks to correct this undercount by using two principal methods of survey that account for a range of error. The two survey methods, which will be implemented in a multi-step process, are known as “simultaneous double-count” with sightability bias correction and “mark-resight” using photographs. The directive, prompted by the GAO report, can be accessed at this link.

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Myth #11: The Government Accountability Office, in a report issued in October 2008, found that the BLM has been mismanaging the Wild Horse and Burro Program.

Fact: This claim is completely false. The GAO made no such finding. The full report can be accessed here: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0977.pdf

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Myth #12: Wild horses are native to the United States.

Fact: This claim is false. The disappearance of the horse from the Western Hemisphere for 10,000 years supports the position that today’s American wild horses should not be considered “native.” American wild horses are descended from domestic horses, some of which were brought over by European explorers in the late 15th and 16th centuries, plus others that were released or escaped captivity in modern times. Over this 500-year period, these horses (and burros) have adapted successfully to the Western range. Regardless of the debate over whether these animals are native or non-native, the BLM manages horses and burros on public lands according to the provisions of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, which describes the animals as “wild” rather than feral.

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Myth #13: Two million wild horses roamed the United States in the late 1800s/early 1900s.

Fact: This mythical figure has no historical basis; it is complete speculation. In a book titled The Mustangs (1952) by J. Frank Dobie, the author noted that no scientific estimate of wild horse numbers was made in the 19th century or early 20th century. He went on to write: “All guessed numbers are mournful to history. My own guess is that at no time were there more than a million mustangs in Texas and no more than a million others scattered over the remainder of the West.” (Emphasis added.) Mr. Dobie’s admitted “guess” of no more than two million mustangs has over the years been transformed into an asserted “fact” that two million mustangs actually roamed America in the late 1800s/early 1900s. When it comes to the historical wild horse population, a substantiated and more relevant figure is the number found roaming in 1971, when the BLM was given legal authority to protect and manage wild horses and burros. That number was 17,300 wild horses (plus 8,045 burros), as compared to today’s estimated population of 33,780 wild horses (plus 6,825 burros).

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Myth #14: Under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, BLM-administered public lands where wild horses and burros were found roaming in 1971 are to be managed “principally but not necessarily exclusively” for the welfare of these animals.

Fact: The law’s language stating that public lands where wild horses and burros were found roaming in 1971 are to be managed “principally but not necessarily exclusively” for the welfare of these animals relates to the Interior Secretary’s power to “designate and maintain specific ranges on public lands as sanctuaries for their protection and preservation” — which are, thus far, the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range (in Montana and Wyoming), the Nevada Wild Horse Range (located within the northcentral portion of Nellis Air Force Range), the Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Range (in Colorado), and the Marietta Wild Burro Range (in Nevada). The “principally but not necessarily exclusively” language applies to specific Wild Horse Ranges, not to Herd Management Areas in general. The Code of Federal Regulations (43 CFR, Subpart 4710.3-2) states: “Herd management areas may also be designated as wild horse or burro ranges to be managed principally, but not necessarily exclusively, for wild horse or burro herds.”

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Myth #15: The Code of Federal Regulations (43 CFR) specifies that the BLM is to allocate forage to wild horses and burros in an amount “comparable” to that allocated to wildlife and cattle.

Fact: The Code of Federal Regulations (43 CFR, Subpart 4700.0-6) states that “Wild horses and burros shall be considered comparably with other resource values in the formulation of land use plans.” This regulation means that in its development of land-use plans, the BLM will consider wild horses and burros in a manner similar to the way it treats other resource values (e.g., cultural, historic, wildlife, and scenic, as distinguished from authorized commercial land uses, such as livestock grazing or timber harvesting).

 

SOURCE: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/whbprogram/history_and_facts/myths_and_facts.html

 

Spencer Lennard: Subsidies turn Emigrant Wilderness into grazing nightmare – California Forum – The Sacramento Bee

15 Sep

English: A cow icon

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Even though this situation is disgusting, I’m glad that someone other than a wild horse advocate sees and writes about the damage that has been done by domestic cattle.  Not one mention of wild horses causing the damage in this article.   The domestic cattle are not native to the Americas but the wild horses are native!

 

Click these titles to blog posts to learn more on the history of  horses in the USA:

 

Wyoming Cave Dig Reveals Hundreds of Ice Age Fossils

Dispel the Myth of The Aboriginal North American Horse

 

Spencer  Lennard wrote the article below he is an avid hiker, mountaineer and public lands advocate who lives in Oregon.

Read the article here:

Spencer Lennard: Subsidies turn Emigrant Wilderness into grazing nightmare – California Forum – The Sacramento Bee.

 

 

 

Wyoming Cave Dig Reveals Hundreds of Ice Age Fossils

15 Aug

This July 2014 image shows the entrance to the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the late Pleistocene period tens of thousands of years ago. Scientists have resumed digging for the first time in more than 30 years. (AP Photo/Bureau of Land Management)

 

 Wyoming Cave Dig Reveals Hundreds of Ice Age Fossils

By Laura Dattaro Published: Aug 11, 2014, 11:09 AM EDT

A Wyoming cave has turned up hundreds of fossils of animals that roamed the Americas around the time of the last Ice Age. The fossils range from small creatures like lizards and snakes to megafauna like bison.

“We found evidence of bison, a bit of gray wolf and quite a lot of cheetah and horse,” paleontologist Julie Meachen, who led a team of international researchers on a recent dig, told Reuters.The two-week dig ended on Friday.

Meachen spearheaded the two-week exploration of the cave, called Natural Trap Cave, which was first discovered in the 1970s and hasn’t been studied since. The only entrance is a 15-foot hole in the ground that’s now covered by a metal grate, according to the Associated Press. The researchers believe the animals whose bones are preserved below stumbled into the hole and fell to their deaths. The drop to the ground is about 85 feet.

The cold, damp conditions inside the cave kept the animals’ remains well preserved, according to Reuters. Studying the fossils could reveal information about the last Ice Age extinction, which occurred about 10,000 years ago. The remains are between 12,000 and 23,000 years old.

“Some bones still have collagen with intact DNA for genetic testing and some fossils are fragments crushed by rocks,” Meachen told Reuters. “But we take it for what it is when we find it.”

During the dig, two animals slipped through the grate covering the hole — a deer mouse, which survived and was sent back to the surface, and a pack rat, which died. The researchers left the pack rat’s body where it fell and plan to observe it over time to understand the decay rate inside in the cave.

More than 30,000 fossils have been removed the cave since its discovery, according to the U.S. National Park Service’s web site, including mammoths, lions and camels. No evidence of human activities has been found in the caves, leading researchers to believe the hole, which is difficult to spot from a distance, was once located along a migratory corridor. Layered sediments in the cave have revealed that the region went from a glacial climate to its current desert climate in just 500 years.

“It’s an incredible site,” Brent Breithaupt, a paleontologist for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), told the Associated Press. “It definitely is one of the most significant sites that BLM manages, and it will provide very, very important information.”

source: Wyoming Cave Dig Reveals Hundreds of Ice Age Fossils – weather.com.

Hot August Nights No Fun for Some

3 Aug

After recently looking at all the horses and burros available for adoption in the short-term holding pens via the BLM Internet Adoption auction, many of them have suffered more that two freezing winters without out shelter from the wind in winter or two sweltering hot summers without shade, with nothing to do as well. Even though the wild horses and burros are supposed to be protected by BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program, so far all we’ve seen is BLM WH&B program jump through hoops for the cattle ranchers and ignores every request or offer of help by the public to construct some shelter for the horses from the sun and wind, built in the corrals, free of charge. Sure would be appreciated if HSUS would speak up about the lack of  a CAWP.   ~admin

Hot August Nights No Fun for Some by Monika Courtney

 

The public’s appreciation for wild horses is strong. So is the call for a moratorium on round ups and reform within. Now, mid-late 2014, we have gained:

1)  NAS recommendations stating helicopter round ups are cruel and restructure of standards are long overdue.

2)  A “workshop” (2013) with concentrated efforts by the public to assist / provide input for shelter in holding.

3)  A clear recognition by unbiased equine experts and the tax-paying public that relief is needed and warranted – written input and recommendations and much more, submitted at Reno workshop.

4) Yet, we have gained NOTHING in all aspects, such as: increased comfort, shade/shelter, CAWP (Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program), or common ground as discussed during Advisory Board meeting in DC of last year. Concrete inquiries thereof are ignored.

5)  And more herds are destroyed, wiped out and sent to government suffering.

July 10, 2014 91 degrees Palomino Valley BLM Photo by P Bumgarner  ("left there close to noon, after trying to cool down in the office")

July 10, 2014 91 degrees Palomino Valley BLM Photo by P Bumgarner (“left there close to noon, after trying to cool down in the office”)

Concerns of wild horses being funneled to slaughter through tribal nations possibly government funded for this are stronger than ever. The association of Boyd Spratling  (BLM Board / DVM) to United Horsemen and cattle men who want to rid our wild horses with slaughter, is alarming.

The HSUS remains silent, while BLM spins their way out of cruel treatment, frivolous use of taxpayer monies, and protection of the welfare ranching industry. While offers by individuals like me to raise funds to accommodate the need for “increased comfort” aka shade are ignored, a dubious shade trial geared to appease further delays the topic at core is prevalent.

For those needing a look at the ongoing crisis, please see this:

http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nbc-news/51424048#51424048

Please send letters. Voice your outrage over the lack of CAWP and innovative shade / shelter for severe weather protocol. Horses step into snow on mountain tops to cool down in summer, and seek shade, a clear, logical proven fact, continuously refuted by BLM minimalist “trials” to possibly announce the non-utilization in the near future to further dismiss the topic.

Wild horses seek shade to survive summer heat, near Dayton, NV July 23 2014 photo taken by : Lea Harney Dudum

The violation of humane standards cannot be tolerated !

Where is the Humane Society of the United States? Where is  improvement suggested in a letter to BLM by Holly Hazard of HSUS, last summer? Was that just a placating appeal or a perfunctory duty? What is the HSUS’s work in this besides the devotion for contraception – but the cruelties of stampedes and social disruption of horses ? Why the lack of disclosure in “All Animals” of the horror, destruction and chaos in round ups?  Why not show the squalor of holding camps to the membership?  Where is CAWP?  Where is any reform – preached by Abbey back when, then Guilfoyle, then Roberson?

Then BLM contracts a pro-slaughter defender (during the debate over Prop. 6 in CA, who lobbied hard for the AVMA) – another paid “expert” to join the ranks of BLM propaganda – to establish (in the face of public outrage) the non-need of shade for wild (but trapped!) ones, because there are “no” studies??  There is plenty of evidence by experts who know the range and wild horses’ needs and behaviour in the wild – photos were mounted on poster boards and submitted at workshop. To denounce their need for shade from heat stress in barren feed lot setups is ridiculous !

Why do the wild horses of America not get a fair shake?

These two deaths could have been avoided – yet the bad norm goes on. A lack of federal guidelines and modern humanity goes on. Inquiries are ignored – of horses being choked by extreme tight tags, horses suffering in the sweltering heat and horses disappearing. Yet… bureaucratic trials and costly, unnecessary studies are established instead of real reform.

 

Feeling choked ? Photo courtesy by P. Bumgarner

Feeling choked ? Photo courtesy by P. Bumgarner 

Ask yourself if this is how democracy operates. I believe not. I am still waiting for a reply by Debbie Collins, and Zachary Reichold of PVC on the latest, re CAWP, helicopter “data” submitted to BLM by Dr. Stull in May, and real, effective shelter progress. In plain- just an update of all they keep promising us, since years. I am also waiting for help by HSUS, beyond the donation of tarps for sick pens or the good work they do against slaughter. Help for the wild ones, as they suffer the most, a demonstration of common ground and solutions that serve the wild horses, the symbol of freedom in this United Land of the Free. 

Palomino Valley Hay Storage photo ©2011 afroditi katsikis
Shade for hay but not horses! Palomino Valley hay storage photo ©2011 afroditi katsikis

 

Utah ATV protest peaceful

10 May

San Juan County Commissioner Phil Lyman briefs ATV riders Saturday morning at Centennial Park in Blanding, Utah, on a plan for a protest ride into Recapture Canyon east of town. photo by John Peel/Durango Herald

The ‘peaceful demonstration in Iron County today was advertised for the last two weeks or more. The BLM knew about the plan of the locals to ride their ATV’s through Recapture Valley which has an 11 mile stretch of land full of archaeological artifacts of the Pueblo who were the first to live on that land; this land has been closed off to ATVs and motorized vehicles since September 2007. 

“Also, a statement issued after the ride from BLM Utah Director Juan Palma said the BLM had documented those who rode Saturday into the area closed to motorized use.

“The BLM was in Recapture Canyon today collecting evidence and will continue to investigate,” Palma’s statement said. “The BLM will pursue all available redress through the legal system to hold the lawbreakers accountable.”

I’m surprised to learn that the BLM stood by and watched as these motorized vehicles drove through this delicate area! BLM has itchy fingers when it comes to wild horse advocates taking photos at roundups and has even arrested some advocates for doing so! Taking photographs are harmless, but destroying or disturbing ancient artifacts is a totally different situation.

“Part of Palma’s BLM statement:

“Regrettably, after a peaceful rally in Blanding, Utah, a number of individuals broke the law by driving ATVs through Recapture Canyon where ancient artifacts and dwellings may have been damaged by the riders.

“As always, our first and most important priority is the safety of the public and our employees, and our actions today reflect that. The BLM’s law enforcement presence today focused on recording and documenting individuals who chose to violate the law by traveling into the closure area on ATVs.”

 

If BLM was that concerned about the value of the artifacts in Recapture Canyon, why didn’t they stop the ATV ride through it before the ride began? Are they busy arresting wild horse advocates who are merely taking photographs?

Recapture Reservoir, Blanding,  Utah

Recapture Reservoir, Blanding, Utah (Photo credit: MortAuPat)

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